full of pith & vinegar

3 notes

Selfie as Author Photo. Just crazy enough to work?
ETA: Reactions!
My mother: “I think you are much prettier than either picture conveys and you probably should not be posed in front of the ladder with the articles on it.  The vase almost looks like an adornment to your hair.  If this is a serious picture, then I would go have my hair done and have the hairdresser take a picture with your camera.  Also, you’re wearing your glasses.”
My cousin itsthereal (Jeff): “i think the picture’s okay? it’s a little blurry, but that could be an aesthetic choice or whatever. VERY ROCOCO? … GET BEN TO TAKE THE PICTURE. or lara, very artsy shot by lara”
sigh.

Selfie as Author Photo. Just crazy enough to work?

ETA: Reactions!

My mother: “I think you are much prettier than either picture conveys and you probably should not be posed in front of the ladder with the articles on it.  The vase almost looks like an adornment to your hair.  If this is a serious picture, then I would go have my hair done and have the hairdresser take a picture with your camera.  Also, you’re wearing your glasses.”

My cousin itsthereal (Jeff): “i think the picture’s okay? it’s a little blurry, but that could be an aesthetic choice or whatever. VERY ROCOCO? … GET BEN TO TAKE THE PICTURE. or lara, very artsy shot by lara”

sigh.

Filed under selfie i hate pictures author photo family

604 notes

slaughterhouse90210:

“A woman had to choose her own particular unhappiness carefully. That was the only happiness in life: to choose the best unhappiness. An unwise move, good God, and you could squander everything.” —Lorrie Moore, Bark

Three geniuses at work here.

slaughterhouse90210:

“A woman had to choose her own particular unhappiness carefully. That was the only happiness in life: to choose the best unhappiness. An unwise move, good God, and you could squander everything.”
—Lorrie Moore, Bark

Three geniuses at work here.

2 notes

Who’s keeping her name this week?

Dr. Carlo, 31, is keeping her name. She is an internist at Memorial Sloan- Kettering Cancer Center in New York.
Ms. Alvarez is keeping her name. She is an associate at the New York law firm Davis Polk & Wardwell.
Natalie Anne Bailey, 31, is keeping her name. She works at Unicef in Manhattan, where she is responsible for communications and outreach strategies on H.I.V. and AIDS. She graduated magna cum laude from St. Mary’s College at Notre Dame and received a master’s degree in journalism at Northwestern University.
Ms. Sirowitz, 56, will keep her name. She is a director of communications at UJA-Federation of New York, where she promotes and markets the organization’s programs and services. She is also a clinical social worker and a psychotherapist in New York. She graduated summa cum laude from Fordham and received a master’s degree in social work from Yeshiva University.

That’s one doctor, one lawyer, one journalist, and one social worker/psychotherapist/professional Jewish lady.
via NYT Weddings & Celebrations

Who’s keeping her name this week?

Dr. Carlo, 31, is keeping her name. She is an internist at Memorial Sloan- Kettering Cancer Center in New York.

Ms. Alvarez is keeping her name. She is an associate at the New York law firm Davis Polk & Wardwell.

Natalie Anne Bailey, 31, is keeping her name. She works at Unicef in Manhattan, where she is responsible for communications and outreach strategies on H.I.V. and AIDS. She graduated magna cum laude from St. Mary’s College at Notre Dame and received a master’s degree in journalism at Northwestern University.

Ms. Sirowitz, 56, will keep her name. She is a director of communications at UJA-Federation of New York, where she promotes and markets the organization’s programs and services. She is also a clinical social worker and a psychotherapist in New York. She graduated summa cum laude from Fordham and received a master’s degree in social work from Yeshiva University.

That’s one doctor, one lawyer, one journalist, and one social worker/psychotherapist/professional Jewish lady.

via NYT Weddings & Celebrations

Filed under feminism women new york times vows style

1 note

MY foot selfie is about being alone in a crowd, lying in the bed in which my life could possibly (probably not, but possibly) end. Covered in a white sheet, watching the world go on without me. My foot selfie is about death. Now THAT’S a selfie.

When we were young, people couldn’t tell that my older brother Adam and I were related. A woman in Arizona, where my family was on vacation, once clomped up to us, pointed at Adam, and demanded to know, “Is he adopted?”

Nowadays, I like to think the resemblance is more pronounced. Sure, Adam is over 6’ and plays basketball for fun in LA, where he lives, whereas I am under 5’2” and play Scrabble in NYC, but we both write about minor, yet traumatic health experiences for the Internet.

Compare and contrast: Adam’s reflections on his tour of Medi-land (“5 Things I Learned From Having Surgery”) and mine (“The Best Time I Got My Wisdom Teeth Out”).

Mine begins:

I’m not a brave person. There’s a reason I carry small, dissolvable tablets of Klonopin around with me in my change purse. I don’t like pain, I hide from danger, and I am not even that crazy about excitement.

“Do you want to get your wisdom teeth out?” a dentist asked me in high school.

“No, thanks!” I said because, A) obviously, and B) I assumed he was asking the question rhetorically, the way my mother asked if I wanted to empty the dishwasher. Instead he said, “Okay!” What kind of idiot, hippie dentist does that? Why not ask a dog if he wants his shots, or that drunk guy you took home if he wants to use a condom?

Adam’s:

When I was growing up, if I wanted to do something my father considered risky, he would say, “That would be like a getting a non-Jewish doctor – you might be okay, but you’re not playing the odds.”  I don’t think he had a lot of math to back that up, but he said it all the time.

So, I couldn’t help feeling a bit uneasy when I arrived for surgery at a hospital called The Little Company of Mary.  There were crosses everywhere – they were really flaunting the non-Jewishness of it.  I felt a little out of place.

But then, in the elevator, there was a cross with Mary on it. Her eyes were bugged and her arms were raised to the sides.  She looked super pissed.  It occurred to me that Mary was a Jewish woman, probably not that different from my mom.  I looked at her on that cross and I knew what she was thinking:

“If I told that boy once I told him a HUNDRED TIMES: ‘Stop preaching that michigas about helping the poor or you’ll get yourself KILLED!’  Oyyyy, vey is mir!  You know whose fault this is, don’t you?  His FATHER’S!”

Who wore it better? I report, you decide.

Filed under sibling rivalry adam bloom

596 notes

slaughterhouse90210:

“We are so convinced of the goodness of ourselves, and the goodness of our love, we cannot bear to believe that there might be something more worthy of love than us, more worthy of worship. Greeting cards routinely tell us everybody deserves love. No. Everybody deserves clean water. Not everybody deserves love all the time.” 

― Zadie Smith, White Teeth
I couldn’t help but wonder if Carrie ever had a thought this profound or cruelly true in her entire life.

slaughterhouse90210:

“We are so convinced of the goodness of ourselves, and the goodness of our love, we cannot bear to believe that there might be something more worthy of love than us, more worthy of worship. Greeting cards routinely tell us everybody deserves love. No. Everybody deserves clean water. Not everybody deserves love all the time.”

― Zadie Smith, White Teeth

I couldn’t help but wonder if Carrie ever had a thought this profound or cruelly true in her entire life.

Filed under sexandthecity slaughterhouse90201 zadie smith

1 note

10. The writers Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman, who are married to each other, have four children. So does the psychologist and author Sonja Lyubomirsky, author of The How of Happiness. And the novelist Dara Horn.

11. Ever since I was fourteen years old and my sister was born, making me the oldest of four children, I have taken note of other four-child families. John Updike had four children (but he and his wife then divorced, so, you know, asterisk).

12. Writers tend not to have many children, I think. Among writers my age, I can think of more divorces than children. This is especially true of New York–area writers, and truest of all when they edit literary journals. When I am feeling bad for not being more celebrated, my children are a comfort; thinking of more celebrated writers or editors with fewer children is also a comfort. I would call it Schadenfreude, but can one properly take pleasure in others’ misfortune if the unfortunate ones don’t know that they are unfortunate?

The thoughtful and delightful Mark Oppenheimer on being the father of four daughters. Other parents of four children he neglected to mention: American treasure Shirley Jackson and her husband; Amos Bronson and Abby May Alcott; the Ephrons and the Hiltons.

I wrote my own piece on the subject, “How Many Children To Have: A Scientific Analysis," before I had any at all. Perhaps it’s time to revisit the question.

Filed under children marriage procreation

15 notes

millionsmillions:

The New York Times recently asked Jennifer Szalai and Mohsin Hamid why there isn’t a Great American Novel written by a woman? Both writers concluded that there is no such thing as the Great American Novel. “But if the idea of the Great American Novel is blinding us to exquisite fiction written by women, then perhaps its harm is exceeding its usefulness,” Hamid wrote. We think that’s a bit of a cop out. But a few women showed up on our list of the Greatest American Novels.

I addressed this phenomenon for the Huffington Post recently: How to Write the Great American Novel (in 10 easy steps!)

millionsmillions:

The New York Times recently asked Jennifer Szalai and Mohsin Hamid why there isn’t a Great American Novel written by a woman? Both writers concluded that there is no such thing as the Great American Novel. “But if the idea of the Great American Novel is blinding us to exquisite fiction written by women, then perhaps its harm is exceeding its usefulness,” Hamid wrote. We think that’s a bit of a cop out. But a few women showed up on our list of the Greatest American Novels.

I addressed this phenomenon for the Huffington Post recently: How to Write the Great American Novel (in 10 easy steps!)

Filed under fiction great american novel writing writers